Taboo, W.E. Harney

taboo harney

In putting away Kim Scott’s Taboo after reading and writing it up for my last post (here) I saw I had another Taboo, a gift as it turns out from my father to his father for Christmas, 1944, the first book by white bushman cum writer Bill Harney (1895-1962) who mixed closely with the Indigenous people of northern Australia, in the cattle and fishing industries, and at the time this book was written, as a Native Affairs patrol officer.

Let me be clear that it is not my intention to endorse the views contained in this book, nor to offer it as alternative to Scott’s, but rather to make a critical reading of an old-fashioned account by an ostensibly sympathetic observer of peoples maybe only one generation removed from the “old ways”.

Harney’s Taboo is a collection of stories with an extended Introduction by the anthropologist AP Elkin (ADB). Elkin, in his time a noted defender of the rights of Aborigines, writes:

… Harney has lived in Arnhem Land, Northern Territory, for about twenty years, contracting, trading and working at this, that and the other. From the moment he realized that the natives, though different from us, were human like ourselves, he has taken a sympathetic and intelligent interest in them, seeking to understand them.

He goes on to speculate on the causes of ‘aboriginal depopulation’, citing ‘clashes’, introduced diseases, and ‘psychological’: “the upsetting of that balance or equilibrium between man, his fellows and nature, which had been developed in the course of centuries” and which the coming of the white man brought to a sudden end.

… almost every story in this book is a concrete illustration of the change wrought in the natives’ manner of life by contact with the white man and his ways, and of the disastrous consequences.

Reverie: Harney sits on the beach with trepang curing, watching an old man singing dreamtime songs to children, and muses on similarities between cultures. “Their numerous customs, so like our own, point to a common origin.”

Cananda: A legend of love and jealousy recorded in the hope it may never be forgotten, tied to a story told by a white trader on a sailing vessel in the Gulf, of hearing the spirit of a man cry out overhead at the moment of his death a hundred miles away.

The Law:  A harsh story of Ramajerrie who refused to be a stockman but instead lived by raiding the bosses’ cattle, who took leniency as a sign to continue, so his little band of marauders were shot up and the survivors tricked into eating poisoned flour; and his son Ngiaroo, who was sceptical of traditional law and was killed for failing to give up his wife to an elder, while his killer, who did respect traditional law, is sentenced to jail.

The Secret: The sad tale of a man who saves the life of the policeman arresting him out of fear of being blamed, and is honoured for it; then saves the life of a little white girl through his own bravery, but is cursed and left to die for making her cry.

And so we go on with stories and photos and a great deal of Aboriginal language and knowledge. Stories of laws abandoned because traditional punishments are illegal under white man’s law; stories of white men misusing the law to prevent their ‘house gins’ being claimed in traditional marriages; and over and over again, stories of Indigenous people being murdered in the name of justice, or more often, just to prevent them from living and hunting on cattle pasture, which of course includes all the best water:

Nugget was of a different clay from Jack; he was a hard man. Pity help the native who crossed his path. Some of them tried it once, but he gave them a feed – rice flavoured with arsenic; and …

people heard of the murder [of Jack], and a body of white men with a policeman in charge started out in pursuit of the killers – a punitive expedition, the strong chasing the weak, killing all that came in their way, the innocent as well as the guilty. [The Good Samaritan]

I think however, that in his own mind at least, Harney’s thesis is that the Aborigines are/were a primitive (but interesting) people giving way to a superior civilization,

Of course, we smile at these simple people, with their foolish superstitions; nevertheless, I have found that behind their ideas is a deal of logic. [The Mumba]

And he is fair enough to point out that “we once hung camphor bags around children’s necks to keep away sickness” and that a great many whites wear the crucifixes and medallions of their own superstitions.

Let us end with Justice, the story of a man whose mother was chased over a cliff when he was a babe in arms, was brought up ‘white’, visited the city, but in his home town –

… saw natives led about on chains, prisoners for some paltry offence, being given a feed of half-cooked rice and then a drink of water just before they got to town, so that, as they marched down the street, the people were amazed at the way they were treated – they looked so full. The knowing ones laughed at the joke – the police did well out of the native arrests, as they received one shilling a feed per man.

He saw, “and being intelligent, understood”, and ran away to the bush, raising the “standard of revolt, carrying death to the white man in its trail”, until he and his little band were chased down and killed.

So these are stories which were current, no doubt well known and thought unexceptional, when John Howard (1939- ) was a boy and yet which, when they were revived and substantiated during his prime ministership, he mendaciously labelled as a “black armband” view of history.

 

W.E. Harney, Taboo, Australasian Publishing Co., Sydney, 1943

see also my post on Ion Idriess and particularly his novel Nemarluk which is from the same period and general location (here)

 

8 thoughts on “Taboo, W.E. Harney

    • I don’t think so (and he’s astonishingly casual about the killing). Most writers of this time were of the opinion that the Aborigines were primitive, interesting and on the way out, perhaps taking their cue from Daisy Bates. Certainly Ernestine Hill a few years earlier was more outraged and maybe even Mrs Gunn 40 years earlier saw as much humanity. An interesting question, I’ll think some more.

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      • It would be illuminating, wouldn’t it, to have a book exploring the changing depiction of Aborigines in AustLit over the course of the C20th, acknowledging the good, the bad and the terrible, but also tracing the progress in attitudes. There must be academics who’ve done this for PhDs, but I don’t know of one that’s written for ordinary mortals. I don’t want to read an academic text about it. Such a book, to have credibility and insight, would need to be co-edited by somebody like Anita Heiss (who co-edited the PEN Macquarie Anthology of Aboriginal Literature) and someone with a really good grasp of early AusLit (that Frenchman Vernay comes to mind but there must be an Australian with similar credentials, I just can’t think who it might be).

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  1. I’d like to get my hands on a book of stories about the indigenous tribe that lives where I grew up, the Ojibwe, or Chippewa (the Anglicized name). When I was a child, the tribe was in danger of losing its language. They put up a casino about 20 years ago, bringing in revenue that allowed them to build cultural centers and put up signs in Ojibwe. It’s a language that describes a thing instead of having a word. For instance, instead of “apple pie,” you get “mishiimini-baashkiminasigani-biitoosijigani-bakwezhigan” (yes, I had to look that up). The word describes apple pie.

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  2. Kim Scott, who wrote the Taboo I reviewed last week (https://theaustralianlegend.wordpress.com/2017/12/06/taboo-kim-scott/) is involved in recovering local Indigenous language, and that is partly what his book is about, and there are similar projects around the country. I’m not sure how many stories are recovered but kept within the Indigenous community. In the first half of the C20th here, a number of europeans who had mixed with Indigenous people releasedbooks of ‘dreamtime’ stories in the belief that the Aborigines were dying out, but this doesn’t happen so much now.

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